2017 IRS Tax Deadlines & Tax Tip

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IRS Tax Deadlines

The dates below relate to calendar year-end taxpayers  If the deadline falls on a weekend or holiday, then the form is due the following business day.

Check out the latest Tax Tip at the bottom of this post.

 

Individuals
If you are self-employed, a sole proprietor, a freelancer or a contractor

April 15th – Form 1040, Individual Income Tax Return. This form is due on the 15th day of the 4th month after the end of your tax year.
OR
April 15th if filing an extension – Form 4868. This form is used to request an extension of time to file Form 1040.
October 15th if filed a Form 4868 extension – Form 1040.

Estimated tax payments (Form 1040-ES) 

Payments are due on the 15th day of the 4th, 6th, and 9th months of your tax year and on the 15th day of the 1st month after your tax year ends.

  • Payment 1 is due April 17th for current year
  • Payment 2 is due June 15th for current year
  • Payment 3 is due September 15th for current year
  • Payment 4 is due January 17th for prior year

 

Partnerships
A partnership is the relationship existing between two or more persons who join to carry on a trade or business.

March 15th  – Form 1065.  Provide each partner with a copy of their Schedule K-1 (Form 1065) or substitute Schedule K-1 (Form 1065) by the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of the partnership’s tax year.
OR
March 15th if filing an extension – Form 7004 is used to request an automatic 6-month extension of time to file Form 1065.
September 15th if filed Form 7004 extension.

Form 1065-B (electing large partnerships).   This form is due on the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of the partnership’s tax year. Provide each partner with a copy of their Schedule K-1 (Form 1065-B) or substitute Schedule K-1 (Form 1065-B) by
March 15 following the close of the partnership’s tax year.

This due date for filing Schedule K-1 (Form 1065-B) applies even if the partnership requests an extension of time to file Form 1065-B. Form 7004 is used to request an automatic 6-month extension of time to file Form 1065-B.

      Want to ADD THESE DATES to your calendar?    

   Use the IRS CalendarConnector    

 

Corporations and S Corporations
In forming a corporation, prospective shareholders exchange money, property, or both, for the corporation’s capital stock.

Form 1120 (or Form 7004).   This form is due on the 15th day of the 4th month after the end of the corporation’s tax year. However, a corporation with a fiscal tax year ending June 30th must file by the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of its tax year.

A corporation with a short tax year ending anytime in June will be treated as if the short year ended on June 30, and must file by the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of its tax year.  Form 7004 is used to request an automatic 6-month extension of time to file Form 1120.

However, corporations with a fiscal tax year ending June 30, or a short tax year treated as if the short year ended June 30 will use Form 7004 to request an automatic 7-month extension of time to file Form 1120.

Form 1120S (or Form 7004).   This form is due on the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of the corporation’s tax year. Provide each shareholder with a copy of their Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S) by the 15th day of the 3rd month after the end of the corporation’s tax year. Form 7004 is used to request an automatic 6-month extension of time to file Form 1120S.

Estimated Tax Payments   

Payments are due on the 15th day of the 4th, 6th, 9th, and 12th months of the corporation’s tax year.

Form 2553.   This form is used to choose S corporation treatment. It is due no more than two months and 15 days after the beginning of the tax year the election is to take effect or at any time during the preceding tax year.

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Employer’s Tax Calendar

This tax calendar covers various due dates of interest to employers. Principally, it covers the following federal taxes.

  • Income tax you withhold from your employees’ wages or from non-payroll amounts you pay out.
  • Social security and Medicare taxes (FICA taxes) you withhold from your employees’ wages and the social security and Medicare taxes you must pay as an employer.
  • Federal unemployment (FUTA) tax you must pay as an employer.

The calendar lists due dates for filing returns and for making deposits of these three taxes throughout the year. Use this calendar with Pub. 15 which gives the deposit rules.

Forms You Need

The following is a list and description of the primary employment tax forms you may need.

  1. Form 940, Employer’s Annual Federal Unemployment (FUTA) Tax Return. This form is due the last day of the first calendar month after the calendar year ends. Use it to report the FUTA tax on wages you paid.
  2. Form 941, Employer’s QUARTERLY Federal Tax Return. This form is due the last day of the first calendar month after the calendar quarter ends. Use it to report social security and Medicare taxes and withheld income taxes on wages if your employees aren’t farm workers or household employees.
  3. Form 943, Employer’s Annual Federal Tax Return for Agricultural Employees. This form is due the last day of the first calendar month after the calendar year ends. Use it to report social security and Medicare taxes and withheld income taxes on wages if your employees are farm workers.
  4. Form 944, Employer’s ANNUAL Federal Tax Return. This form is due the last day of the first calendar month after the calendar year ends. Certain small employers use it instead of Form 941 to report social security and Medicare taxes and withheld income tax.
  5. Form 945, Annual Return of Withheld Federal Income Tax. This form is due the last day of the first calendar month after the calendar year ends. Use it to report income tax withheld on all non-payroll items. A list of non-payroll items is available in the Instructions for Form 945.

Fiscal-Year Taxpayers

The dates in this calendar apply whether you use a fiscal year or the calendar year as your tax year. The only exception is the date for filing Forms 5500, Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan, and 5500-EZ, Annual Return of One-Participant (Owners and Their Spouses) Retirement Plan. These employee benefit plan forms are due by the last day of the seventh month after the plan year ends. See July 31 publication

 

Extended Due Dates

If you timely deposit in-full the tax that you’re required to report on Form 940, 941, 943, 944, or 945, then you may file the return by the 10th day of the second month that follows the end of the return period.

 

Tax-Exempt Organizations
Non-profit organization under the IRS tax code

If you are a tax-exempt organization under the IRS tax code you still have to file an annual return of income and expenses to the IRS. (Forms 990, 990-EZ, 990-PF, or 990-BL.) The return must be filed by the 15th day of the 5th month after your tax year ends. You may use that deadline to file a Form 8868 to request a 6-month extension to file the annual return.

For example, if your tax year ends December 31st, your deadline to file or extend is May 15th. If you file an extension, the return is due November 15th. If a due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the due date is delayed until the next business day.

Fiscal-Year Taxpayers

If you use a fiscal year (rather than the calendar year) as your tax year, you should change some of the dates in this calendar. Use the following general guidelines to make these changes.

The 3 months that make up each quarter of a fiscal year may be different from those of each calendar quarter, depending on when the fiscal year begins. Also see Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, earlier.

 

W-2s and 1099s

Employers and small businesses must file a W-2 for each employee. If you paid more than $600 to an independent contractor then you must file a 1099. There are 3 copies – one for the IRS, one for the employee or contractor, and one for your records. January 31st is the deadline by which the forms must be postmarked.

 


TAX TIP

Be careful about how you pay your estimated taxes online. Make sure you are choosing the correct “Reason for Payment” and “Apply Payment To” options. Mistaking this information can cause problems with the IRS. 

IRS, Tax Payments, Estimated Payments, Quarterly Tax Payments, Pay IRS Online

 

We know that this is a lot of information, and we want you to be well-prepared for the upcoming tax season. If you have any questions about your specific situation or deadlines, please don’t hesitate to contact our office!

 

January is the time to wrap up the old and start with the new

This goes for all your 2011 and 2012 tax, accounting and bookkeeping work as well.

Now is the time to meet with your tax accountant, if you haven’t already, to calculate your tax estimate for 2011 so you can avoid penalties and interest for not paying your tax on time.  Remember, for self-employed individuals and partners or shareholders who receive K-1 income, January 17th is the due date for your 4th and final 2011 estimated tax payment (Form 1040-ES).  In addition, good planning now will help you avoid a big tax bill surprise in April regardless of whether you are self-employed or not.
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